Neon v2 goes open source

Neon v2

If you’re interested in VJ software, you may probably have heard about Neon v2, the VJ application that shine/xplsv.com developed a few years ago and which has been used not only for lots of VJ gigs but also for creating several real-time demos (including the euskal 2005 winner demo, Sound Pressure)

Unfortunately Shine is very busy right now. But instead of letting the software stagnate, he has made the full sources available under a GPL license, for whoever wants to pick up the development. This pretty much follows the story of Neon v1: when the author (mac/xplsv.com) got too busy, he released the sources for Neon V1 and Shine continued it, creating Neon v2 a while after.

You can check the sources from the SVN repository with your favourite SVN tool, or just be curious and browse them. It has lots of interesting stuff in it. Some examples that come to mind:

  • a full real-time 3d engine, with support for pixel and vertex shaders for building really cool effects
  • 3dsmax mesh export plug-in – if you want to know how to build a plug in for 3dsmax, here’s an example
  • integration with Lua for scripting – allows you to use the engine features programmatically
  • video play, using native windows video support and also ffmpeg for other formats
  • custom skinnable gui

etc etc etc… there are more things but I’ll let you find out by yourself!

As Shine says in the news, if you make new features for it, contact him and we’ll include them on the repository. If the updating gets active we could then manage new users with write-access for the SVN.

I personally wish someone with better knowledge of OpenGL and GUI’s than me would port the software to Mac/Linux (fingers crossed). It would be awesome to have it working without depending on DirectX as it does now (hint hint hint!)

5 thoughts on “Neon v2 goes open source

  1. Greetings!

    thanks for the being the bearer of exciting news. I’ve only had a brief look at your site, but I think I would like to meet you.

    repeat 180[fd 1 rt 2]

    I remember using logo at primary school. The computer room was decked out with Commodore 64′s, networked somehow, I think, to a floppy drive. Wow! “Computer” class was once every second Wednesday; the other Wednesdays were “Craft”. I remember switching once to get an extra week of the former, and started to get books from the library teaching BASIC. They had little cartoon drawings of robots explaining things like an array. I wonder if they are still around – I think I’d like to acquire acquire some. I have no idea who they are by, though. Maybe they are still hiding out in the shelves at my old school!

    From such humble beginnings… perhaps the next level is to pop the hood on this DirectX beast and get that skipping craft to play with comptuer graphics buzz back again.

    Cheers,
    spxl.

  2. Hey subpixel! great reply you have there, I see you still have logo fresh ;)

    My computer classes were out of school timetable so I couldn’t swap anything but still I was looking forward to those days every week! There are lots of old computer magazines & books archived and scanned over the net by nostalgic people. I have a few bookmarked:

    http://www.zzap64.co.uk/cgi-bin/displayhtml.pl
    http://www.crashonline.org.uk/
    http://www.atariarchives.org/
    http://www.lemon64.com/

    they aren’t c64 books exclusive but they will give you a good nostalgia dope anyway :)

    By the way we are still surprised that
    a) there’s a vj meeting (and its associated community) in London
    b) someone is using neon and never told us!

    If you’re going to try and compile it, or have any issue or question, please tell us in the forum.

    I already tried to make the core engine work with opengl but failed a little bit miserably, but I’m pretty sure there are better programmers than me out there that can manage to do it :D

  3. The books with the robots were, I think, not specific to C64s. I remember another book borrowed a few times from the local council library that was specific to some other PC that I never ever saw one of; I recall there being stuff about commands for setting colours and so on that I’d never have actually used.

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