Tag Archives: mozilla

Score another one for the web!

Last week I made a quick trip to Spain. It was a pretty early flight and I was quite sleepy and so… I totally forgot my laptop! I indeed thought that my bag felt “a bit weird”, as the laptop makes the back flat (when it’s in the bag), but I was quite zombified, and so I just kept heading to the station.

I realised my laptop wasn’t there by the time I had to take my wallet out to buy a train ticket. You see, TFL have been making a really big noise about the fact that you can now use your Oyster to travel to Gatwick. But they have been very quiet about requiring people to have enough credit in their cards to pay the full amount of the ticket. And since I use “auto top up”, sometimes my card might have £18. Sometimes it won’t, as in this case.

Anyway, I didn’t want to go back for the laptop, as I was going on a short holidays trip, and a break from computers would be good. Except… I did have stuff to do, namely researching for my next trip!

I could use my phone, but I quite dislike using phones for researching trips: the screen is just too small, the keyboard is insufferable, and I want to open many tabs, look at maps, go back and forth, which isn’t easy on a phone, etc. I could also borrow some relative’s laptop… or I could try to resuscitate and old tablet that I hadn’t used since 2013!

It had become faulty at the beginning of 2013, but I thought I had fixed it. But months after, it decided to enter its mad loop of “restart, restart, restart and repeat” during a transatlantic flight. I had to hide it in my bag and let it expire its battery. And then I was very bored during both the rest of the flight, and the flight back, as all my carefully compiled entertainment was on it. Bah! And so I stopped using it and at some point I brought it to Spain, “just in case”.

Who would have guessed I’d end up using it again!?

I first spent about 30 minutes looking for a suitable plug for the charger. This tablet requires 2A and all the USB chargers I could find were 0.35A or 0.5A. The charger only had USA style pins, but that part could be removed, and revealed a “Mickey mouse” connector, or C7/C8 coupler if you want to be absolutely specific. A few years ago you could find plenty of appliances using this connector, but nowadays? I eventually found the charger for an old camera, with one of these cables! So I made a Frankenchargenstein out of old parts. Perfect.

The tablet took a long time to even show the charging screen. After a while I could finally turn it on, and oh wow, Android has changed a lot for the better since 3.1. But even if this tablet could be updated easily, I had no laptop and no will to install developer tools on somebody else’s laptop. So I was stuck in 3.1.

The Play Store behaved weirdly, with random glitches here and there. Many apps would not show any update, as developers have moved on to use newer versions of the SDK in order to use new hardware features and what not, and I don’t blame them, because programming apps that can work with different SDKs and operating system versions in Android is a terribly painful experience. So the easiest way to deal with old hardware or software versions is just not supporting them at all. But this leaves out people using outdated devices.

One of these “discriminatory apps” I wanted to install for my research was a travel app which lets you save stuff you would like to visit, and displays it on a map, which is very convenient for playing it by ear when you’re out and about. Sadly, it did not offer a version compatible with my device.

But I thought: Firefox still works in Android 3.1!

I got it updated to the latest version and opened the website for this app/service, and guess what? I could access the same functionalities I was looking for, via the web.

And being really honest, it was even better than using the app. I could have a tab with the search results, and open the interesting ones in a different tab, then close them when I was done perusing, without losing the scrolling point in the list. You know… like we do with normal websites. And in fact we’re not even doing anything superspecial with the app either. It’s not like it’s a high end game or like it works offline (which it doesn’t). Heck, it doesn’t even work properly when the network is a bit flaky… like most of the apps out there 😛

So sending a huge thanks to all the Firefox for Android team for extending the life of my ancient device, and a sincere message to app makers: make websites, not apps 😉

No more tap tap tap sounds: yay!

A few days ago the fantastic Fritz from the Netherlands told me that my Hands On Web Audio slides had stopping working and there was no sound coming out from them in Firefox.

Which is pretty disappointing for a slide deck that is built to teach you about Web Audio!

I noticed that the issue was only on the introductory slide which uses a modified version of Stuart Memo’s fantastic THX sound recreation-the rest of slides did play sound.

I built an isolated test case (source) that used a parameter-capable version of the THX sound code, just in case the issue depended on the number of oscillators, and submitted this funnily titled bug to the Web Audio component: Entirely Web Audio generated sound cuts out after a little while, or emits random tap tap tap sounds then silence.

I can happily confirm that the bug has been fixed in Nightly and the fix will hopefully be “uplifted” to DevEdition very soon, as it was due to a regression.

Paul Adenot (who works in Web Audio and is a Web Audio spec editor, amongst a couple tons of other cool things) was really excited about the bug, saying it was very edge-casey! Yay! And he also explained what did actually happen in lay terms: “you’d have to have a frequency that goes down very very slowly so that the FFT code could not keep up”, which is what the THX sound is doing with the filter frequency automation.

I want to thank both Fritz for spotting this out and letting me know and also Stuart for sharing his THX code. It’s amazing what happens when you put stuff on the net and lots of different people use it in different ways and configurations. Together we make everything more robust :-)

Of course also sending thanks to Paul and Ben for identifying and fixing the issue so fast! It’s not been even a week! Woohoo!

Well done everyone! 👏🏼

Hardware Hack Day @ MozLDN, 1

Last week we ran an internal “hack day” here at the Mozilla space in London. It was just a bunch of software engineers looking at various hardware boards and things and learning about them :-)

Here’s what we did!

Sole

I essentially kind of bricked my Arduino Duemilanove trying to get it working with Johnny Five, but it was fine–apparently there’s a way to recover it using another Arduino, and someone offered to help with that in the next NodeBots London, which I’m going to attend.

Francisco

Thinks he’s having issues with cables. It seems like the boards are not reset automatically by the Arduino IDE nowadays? He found the button in the board actually resets the board when pressed i.e. it’s the RESET button.

On the Raspberry Pi side of things, he was very happy to put all his old-school Linux skills in action configuring network interfaces without GUIs!

Guillaume

Played with mDNS advertising and listening to services on Raspberry Pi.

(He was very quiet)

(He also built a very nice LEGO case for the Raspberry Pi, but I do not have a picture, so just imagine it).

Wilson

Wilson: “I got my Raspberry Pi on the Wi-Fi”

Francisco: “Sorry?”

Wilson: “I mean, you got my Raspberry Pi on the network. And now I’m trying to build a web app on the Pi…”

Chris

Exploring the Pebble with Linux. There’s a libpebble, and he managed to connect…

(sorry, I had to leave early so I do not know what else did Chris do!)

Updated, 20 January: Chris told me he just managed to successfully connect to the Pebble watch using the bluetooth WebAPI. It requires two Gecko patches (one regression patch and one obvious logic error that he hasn’t filed yet). PROGRESS!

~~~

So as you can see we didn’t really get super far in just a day, and I even ended up with unusable hardware. BUT! we all learned something, and next time we know what NOT to do (or at least I DO KNOW what NOT to do!).

On Loop 2015

I was invited to join a panel about Open Source and Music in Loop, an slightly unusual (for my “standards”) event. It wasn’t a conference per se, although there were talks. Most of the sessions were panels and workshops, there were very little “individual” talk tracks. Lots of demos, unusual hardware to play with in the hall, relaxed atmosphere, and very little commercialism—really cool!

Continue reading On Loop 2015

Migrating to a new laptop (or: Apple-inflicted misery, once again)

Yesterday I got my new laptop and the technician’s idea was to just migrate all my settings and stuff over from the old one for simplicity, using Mac OS X’s built-in migration assistant.

I actually didn’t want to do this because I liked the notion of a clean slate to get rid of old cruft that I didn’t want anymore, but I thought I would give the migration assistant the benefit of the doubt.

TL;DR: it doesn’t seem to be ready for migrating a laptop that has been given intensive usage and has plenty of small files (think: the contents of node_modules) and big files too (think: screencasts).

The new laptop is one of those ultra light MacBooks with a USB-C connector, so it doesn’t have an Ethernet connector to start with unless you add one via the semidock.

The initial attempt was to migrate data using the wireless network. After three hours and the progress barely changing from “29 hours” to “28 hours” I gave up and started reaching for the Thunderbolt to Ethernet adapters. We stopped the process and set up both computers connected to the same switch with ethernet cables. The estimation was now 4 hours, MUCH BETTER.

I calculated that it would be done at about 20h… so I just kept working with my desktop computer. I had a ton of emails to reply to, so it was OK to not to use my normal environment—you can’t use the computer while it’s being migrated.

A little bit before 20h I looked at the screen and saw “3 minutes to finish copying your documents” and I got all stupidly excited. Things were going according to plan! Yay! So I started to get ready to leave the office.

Next time I looked at the screen it said something way less encouraging: “Copying Applications… 2 hours, 30 minutes left”

I was definitely not going to wait until 22:30 hours… or even worse, because the estimation kept going up–2 hours, 40 minutes now, 3 hours… I decided to go home, not without wondering if the developer in this classic XKCD cartoon was working at Apple nowadays:

Remaining time: Fifteen minutes... Six days... thirty seconds

Urgh.

Today I accidentally slept in (thanks, jetlag) and when I arrived into the office, all full of hope and optimism, I found the screen stuck at “359 hours, 44 minutes left”.

I turned around to Francisco and asked him: “hey, how many days is 359 hours?” He opened up the calculator and quickly found out.

About 14 days.

And 44 minutes, of course.

I gave the migration “assistant” some more benefit of the doubt and went for lunch. When I came back it was still stuck, so it was time to disregard this “assistance” and call rsync into action.

  • I enabled SSH on my old laptop (Preferences – Sharing – Enable remote login)
  • Created an SSH key on my new laptop so I didn’t have to type in the password of the old one each time. Then enabled the new key with ssh-agent, otherwise ssh doesn’t even bother trying to use that key when connecting to remote hosts, and copied and added the new public key to the authorized_keys file in the old computer (the GitHub instructions for generating keys are very good at explaining this).
  • rsync was already installed on the computers I think, or maybe I installed it with brew, but I’d swear it was already there
  • then to copy entire directories I would use something like rsync -avz --exclude '.DS_Store' sole@oldcomputer.local:/Users/sole/folderIWantToCopy/ /path/to/folder/parent
  • except when the folder would have a space in the name, in which case I had to escape it with a TRIPLE BACKSLASH. For example, to copy the VirtualBox VMs folder: rsync -avz --exclude '.DS_Store' sole@oldcomputer.local:/Users/sole/VirtualBox\\\ VMs/ .

I have most of my stuff in a ~/data directory, so migrating between computers should be easy, by just copying that folder.

Whatever wasn’t, I copied manually. For example, the Google Chrome and Chrome Canary profiles, because I didn’t want to set them up from scratch–you can copy them and keep some of the history without having to sign into Google (some of my profiles just don’t have an associated Google ID, thank you very much). Unfortunately things such as cookies are not preserved, so I need to log into websites again. Urgh, passwords.

cd ~/Library/Application\ Support
mkdir Google/Chrome -p
mkdir Google/Chrome\ Canary -p
rsync -avz --exclude '.DS_Store' sole@oldcomputer.local:/Users/sole/Library/Application\\\ Support/Google/Chrome/ ./Google/Chrome/
rsync -avz --exclude '.DS_Store' sole@oldcomputer.local:/Users/sole/Library/Application\\\ Support/Google/Chrome\\\ Canary/ ./Google/Chrome\ Canary/

I also copied the Thunderbird profiles. They are in ~/Library/Thunderbird. That way I avoided setting up my email accounts, and also my custom local rules.

I logged into my Firefox account in Nightly and it just synced and picked up my history, bookmarks, saved passwords and stuff, so I didn’t even need to bother copying the Firefox profiles. It’s very smooth! You should try it too.

Note that I did all this copying before even downloading and running the apps, to avoid them creating a default profile on their first start.

While things were copying I had a look at the list of apps I had installed and carefully selected which ones I wanted to actually re-install. Some of them I installed using homebrew, other using the always-awkward, iTunesque in spirit and behaviour, App Store. Of note: XCode has spent the whole afternoon installing.

I also took this chance to install nvm instead of just node stable, so I can experiment with various versions of node. Maybe. I guess. We’ll see if it’s more of a mess than not!

In short, it’s now almost midnight but I’m done. I started copying things at 17h, and had a few breaks to do things such as laundry, dishwasher, tidying up my flat, grocery shopping, and preparing and eating dinner, so let’s imagine it just took me 4 hours to actually copy the data I was interested in.

Moral of the story: rsync all the things. Don’t trust Apple to know better than you.