Tag Archives: node.js

Possible futures, and nodebotting

You might remember that I was sorting out my music collection. This involves having to use iTunes for adding cover art and editing metadata and blah blah because I’m using a Mac and it seems that everyone has given up on making anything (anything!) better than iTunes.

So iTunes is this big huge mass of software that attempts to do everything at the same time and does nothing particularly well, and we’re all using it because there’s not much more else available. Talk about user choice, wooops.

Yesterday I was realising this horrible situation and started a parade of tweets:

  • I never know whether to cry at the immense UI failure that iTunes is or just laugh at it so ironically being the flagship product at Apple
  • When using iTunes I’m afraid to click on buttons because I do not know what havoc will that unravel. Things move around without explanation
  • There are buttons that turn into something else, something elses that act like buttons, data losses, weirdnesses, ugh
  • The worst is: there doesn’t seem to be anything better in Mac? (!?) 😭PLEASE PROVE ME WRONG, I BEG YOU 😭

Someone suggested Vox, which I haven’t tried yet. But seriously–only one suggestion! is that all that there is? I ended up thinking again about writing my own “player”. Except it would not be a player, or at least, not just a player, but I was thinking more about a sort of jukebox with sync. Of course I have other things to do right now so that’s probably not going to happen unless I win the lottery I don’t play.

I was in a good mood this morning so I decided to pretend I was funny and laugh at this whole mess with another tweet parade:

  • the year is 2030.
    you can do grocery shopping, pay council tax, vote for your fav eurovision artist and resolve git conflicts with iTunes
  • in 2045 iTunes finally gains sentience and writes the code for you. all commit messages mention titles of U2 songs
  • 2525 it is revealed that iTunes has acquired Skynet (to the tune of Visage’s In the Year 2525 but poignantly sung by Bono)
  • 3001: Frank Poole begs to be killed again by HAL 9000 when he sees iSkynet in action

And instead of sitting back and maliciously grin at the idea of this actually happening and how 2030 is in fact quite close in time and I could be saying “I told you so” in only 15 years, I grabbed my bike to go to Tableflip, the home of Nodebots in London, for a lighterweight NodeBots day.

Good things: it was a gorgeous day (specially compared to yesterday’s where it poured with rain for about 90% of the time), and I got lost in Dulwich which is a beautiful, albeit very adhoc and non-grid at all area, so it’s even a pleasure to get lost and wander around those streets.

Bad things: there was nothing bad about getting lost because there was absolutely no rush at any point during the day.

Oli was a fantastic host and he made us bacon sarnies and coffee. Their space is a-ma-zing. It’s full of tools old and new, and equipment and things and dust from sawing and weird mechanical and chemical smells, and flying things in various sizes and shapes, and there’s some other business where someone is building bikes. BIKES!!! It’s all super cool and I came back very excited about making stuff, even if I just managed to sort of use Johnny Five to control a servo:

Meanwhile, Tom was hacking on his Maschina and making it emit various sounds with JavaScript, Alex was transferring PCB positives onto another surface using an electric iron and two other guys were doing fantastic hacky stuff as well. I also got to hear about Fritzing and it looks really good.

I’m glad I got to use part of the equipment in the Spark core kit I got at JSConf.US 2014 which I still hadn’t had time to use. I’m sad I didn’t get to use the Spark core itself because the nodeschool nodebots workshop is designed for Arduinos and I wanted to see something happen physically and not just emulated, but I am certain I’ll be able to research this before iTunes can also talk to Spark devices via iPay or whatever.

Playing with hardware is fun. I am an almost total newbie in this field. I keep forgetting which pin is the N pin for LEDs (it’s the short one, I just looked it up today). I keep forgetting how to read resistors and how to connect things together. It’s all fine: it’s on the internets, somewhere, or alternatively it comes back to me once I get started. I have absolutely no expectations for what I’ll do and so I can’t let myself down if I forget everything from the last time I played with hardware. It’s OK. It’s a game. It’s fine to forget the rules, you can always re-read them.

And if you haven’t had enough future scenarios, here’s also this very funny article: A horror story that starts with Twitter.

npmoffline: installing npm packages from the cache

npm has a feature where you can ask it to install packages from the cache, where cache-min forces npm to avoid installing packages younger than that value:

npm --cache-min 9999999 install <package-name>

This works, but I’m never going to remember that syntax, so I added an alias to my .bashrc file:

alias npmoffline="npm --cache-min 9999999 "

So now when I’m offline on a plane and want to install a package that I’ve already installed in the past (and so I know is in the cache), I can write this:

npmoffline install <package-I-already-installed>

and it will pull the contents from my cache.

Yayyy 🎉

If it doesn’t work you can also list the contents of the cache with

npm cache ls

and see what packages and versions have been cached. Perhaps you can also grep it, to discard the packages you’re not interested in, e.g. the following will only list entries related to node-firefox:

npm cache ls | grep node-firefox

install-to-adb with command line tool!

As I said, I abhor repetition, so I added a new nifty feature to the install-to-adb module I made.

Now it also has a command line tool, and you can push and launch apps from the command line without even having to write a custom script that uses the module (of course, you can still use the module code by requiring it).

install-to-adb /path/to/your/firefoxos/app --launch

Continue reading

Install to ADB: installing packaged Firefox OS apps to USB connected phones (using ADB)

I abhor repetition, so I’m always looking for opportunities to improve my processes. Spending a bit of time early on can save you so much time on the long run!

If you’re trying to build something that can only run in devices (for example, apps that use WiFi direct), pushing updates gets boring really quickly: with WebIDE you have to select each USB device manually and then initiate the push.

So I decided I would optimise this because I wanted to focus on writing software, not clicking on dropdowns and etc.

And thus after a bit of research I can finally show install-to-adb:

In the video you can see how I’m pushing the same app to two Flame phones, both of them connected with USB to my laptop. The whole process is a node.js script (and a bunch of modules!).
Continue reading

Promise.resolve(node-firefox)

As a follow up to my FOSDEM15 post, here’s the link to the Hacks post on node-firefox: Introducing node-firefox. Or if you just want to jump to the code, here’s the project page.

It has got a really positive response and we’ve already got very good questions and ideas for using it in ways that we didn’t expect. Thanks all!

I have to step away from leading the project as my backlog of devrel tasks essentially grows by the day, but I leave node-firefox in the capable hands of my colleagues .DS_Storoz (also known as Brittany Storoz) and tofumatt (also known as tofumatt). Of course I’ll still be hovering around the project and maybe building the occasional module and whatnot! You can’t get rid of me that easily… 😉