Tag Archives: talks

jQuery UK 2015

I attended jQuery UK past week, sorry about the delay in writing about it :-)

The organisation was as smooth as it could be. They made sure we knew where, how and when to go to places and treated us really well, so it was a pleasure to be a speaker in this conference.

I must admit I was stupidly silly with regards to the conference at the very beginning. My programming bias elitism was yelling on my brain “oh I MIGHT NOT NEED jQUERY! Who needs it these days anyway!?”

But turns out that

  1. there’s lots of people who cannot afford to compromise on customer support, so they have to go the pragmatic way, and
  2. there’s a lot about newest web technologies we can share with them too!

So when they asked me to talk about Web Components I opted to frame it in the most pragmatic way too: how to use them without shooting yourself in the foot, so you can start working in a more modular way and taking in all those advantages.

I asked before starting and from an audience of… 300? 400 people? approximately 20 had heard about Web Components and about 10? had implemented them in a project. So I ran a quick introduction on what they were, why they were developed and how they looked like, before tackling them interoperating with the four main “frameworks”: jQuery, React, Ember and Angular.

A write up on the results of my research is upcoming, but in the meantime you can look at the slides if you’re so inclined. Be aware that something in Nightly was crashing with the slides at the time I presented, so if your browser crashes (including Nightly for Android)… you know why ;-)

The talks I watched:

Addy Osmani gave an excellent talk on the state of Chrome’s developer tools and then explained how their team identified performance issues on Wikipedia, and how to fix them (this was related to Paul Irish advising people to not to use jQuery’s hide() method). Also, Paul is sorry for tweeting that without the proper context.

Natasha Rooney explained what Service Workers were and what problems they were meant to solve, but I am afraid if you had not a bit of background it would be a little bit confusing as the topic is *complex*.

Andy Hume explained various techniques on how to deliver fast experiences specially on mobile.

Alex Sexton infused us with a bit of South-West American culture and told us about don’t mess with Texas, then tried to find an equivalent for the web (don’t mess for the web?) with regards to hacking/building websites that cannot be hacked.

Jenn Schiffer explained all about vart.institute* and how it came to be. Also provided multiple screenshots of Dave Methvin keynoting at various jQuery events, which was quite amusing. And invited us to feel more empathy for people in the industry, which is a good thing if you ask me. *you can read it as fart and feel silly and it would also be totally OK

Estelle Weyl gave a very interesting talk on how to use forms and take advantage of all the cool features that browsers are already providing us but some people opt to rewrite in clumsy ways that go against all accessibility and usability best practices.

Ben Foxall did one of his shows (at this point we should call those a performance rather than giving a talk) where he involved everyone on the audience and elevated our phones from mere “phones” to interactive objects or “things” that transcend the simplest notion of “phone”.

I’m sorry I couldn’t watch the rest of talks, but it was great to meet Alice Bartlett, Rosie Campbell, Anne-Gaelle Colom, Rich Harris, Philip Roberts, David Rousset, and of course, Bodil Stokke!

After the last talk finished, we moved to the larger ‘hall’ style space where there were some snacks and drinks and people could mingle and ask questions if they hadn’t had the chance yet, so that was way better for me than going to a crammed pub, as I could walk between groups and speak to different people and not YELL ALL THE TIME. There were also some stands and also RETRO GAMES but I started talking to people and forgot to check out the games. AAAAH! Funny moment: Mike MacCana getting super excited about how he could help them setup multiplayer in DOOM using IPX.

All in all a very interesting conference for people who build websites and are willing to improve their practices or tooling… or both! I definitely learnt a bunch of things, so highly recommend checking it out next year!

How to organise a WebGL event

I got asked this:

Going to organize a series of open, and free, events covering WebGL / Web API […]

We ended up opting for an educational workshop format. Knowing you have experience with WebGL, I’d like to ask you if you woudl support us in setting up the materials […]

In the interest of helping more people that might be wanting to start a WebGL group in their town, I’m posting the answer I gave them:

I think you’re putting too much faith on me

I first learnt maths and then OpenGL and then WebGL. I can’t possibly give you a step by step tutorial that mimics my learning process.

If you have no prior experience with WebGL, I suggest you either look for a (somewhat) local speaker and try to get them to give an introductory talk. Probably people that attend the event will be interested in WebGL already or will get interested after the talk.

Then just get someone from the audience excited about WebGL and have them give the next talk

If you can’t find any speaker, then you’ll need to become one, and for that you’ll need to document yourself. I can’t write a curriculum for you, as it will take way more time than I currently have. WebGL implies many things, from understanding JavaScript to understanding 3D geometry and maths, to how to set the whole system up and running on a browser.

Or can start by learning to use a library such as three.js and once you become acquainted with its fundamentals, start digging into “pure WebGL” if you want, for example writing your own custom shaders.

Or another thing you could do is get together a bunch of people interested in WebGL and try to follow along the tutorials on WebGL or the examples on three.js. So people can discuss aloud what they understand and what they don’t, and help and learn from each other.

I hope this helps you find your way around this incredibly vast subject! Good luck and have fun!

Now you know how to do this. Go and organise events! EASY!

It’s actually not easy.

Questions time after a talk: what about no?

Expanding on my tweet:

I strongly dislike this.

My reasoning is that people often ask questions that…

  • they can themselves answer by going to the project’s websites. For example: “What is the LICENSE?”, or
  • are only of interest to them

In addition,

  • there’s a lot of WELL, ACTUALLY… that we don’t ACTUALLY need to hear, as in “you said X but I guess you ACTUALLY meant Y, am I right?” or “but why did you use X when Y is so much better?” (when they have an special non-disclosed interest in Y)
  • sometimes the question cannot be answered because you need time to check the answer, so it makes the speaker look stupid and it’s not their fault
  • or sometimes the speaker will give you a wrong answer because they are on stage and they are nervous and you just asked them a thing they didn’t rehearse and that will make them look stupid too

and therefore these five minutes would be better used for stretching your legs and leaving people’s brain some time to rest and digest before asking anything.

Or maybe do as Scotland JS did past year, and have a post-talk side track where people who are interested on expanding the subject of the talk can go and discuss further with the speaker.

(By the way, Scotland JS’s CFP is open, go submit, it’s a great conference! Notes on 2014: day 1 and day 2)

Assorted bits and pieces

As we wrap the year and my brain is kind of hazy with the extra food, and the total shock to the system caused by staying in Spain these days, I thought it would be a splendid moment to collect a few things that I haven’t blogged about yet. So there we go:

Talks

In Hacks

We were brainstorming what to close the year with at the Mozilla Hacks blog, and we said: let’s make a best of 2014 post!

For some reason I ended up building a giant list of videos from talks that had an impact on me, whether technical or emotional, or both, and I that thought would be great to share with fellow developers. And then the planets aligned and there was a call to action to help test video playing in Firefox, so we ended up with You can’t go wrong watching JavaScript talks, inviting you to watch these videos AND help test video playing. Two birds with one stone! (but figuratively, we do not want to harm birds, okay? okay!).

Since it is a list I curated, it is full of cool things such as realtime graphics, emoji, Animated GIFs, Web Components, accessibility, healthy community building, web audio and other new and upcoming Web APIs, Firefox OS hardware hacking, and of course, some satire. Go watch them!

Mine

And then the videos for some talks I’ve given recently have been published also.

Here’s the one from CMD+R conf, a new conference in London for Mac/iOS developers which was really nice even though I don’t work on that field. The organiser watched my CascadiaJS 2014 talk and liked it, and asked me to repeat it.

I’m quite happy with how it turned out, and I’m even a tad sad that they cut out a bit of the silly chatter from when I jumped on the stage and was sort of adjusting my laptop. I think it was funny. Or maybe it wasn’t and that’s why they cut it out :-P

Then I also spoke at Full Frontal in Brighton, which is not a new conference but has a bit of a legendary aura already, so I was really proud to have been invited to speak there. I gave an introduction to Web Audio which was sort of similar to the Web Audio Hack Day introduction, but better. Everything gets better when you practice and repeat ;-)

Podcasts

Potch and me were guests in the episode 20 from The Web Platform, hosted by Erik Isaksen. We discussed Web Components, solving out problems for other developers with Brick, the quests you have to go through when you want to use them today, proper component/code design, and some more topics such as accessibility or using components for fun with Audio Tags.

And finally… meet ups and upcoming talks!

I’m going to be hosting the first Ladies Who Code meetup at London of the year. The date is the 6th of January, and here’s the event/sign up page. Come join us at Mozilla London and hack on stuff with fellow ladies who code! :-)

And then on the 13th of January I’ll be also giving an overview talk about Web Components at the first ever London Web Components meetup. Exciting! Here’s the event page, although I think there is a waiting list already.

Finally for-reals I’ll be speaking at the Mozilla room at FOSDEM about Firefox OS app development with node-firefox, a project that Nicola started when he interned at Mozilla last summer, and which I took over once he left because it was too awesome to let it rust.

Of course “app development with node-firefox” is too bland, so the title of the talk is actually Superturbocharging Firefox OS app development with node-firefox. In my defense I came up with that title while I was jetlagged and incubating a severe cold, so I feel zero guilt about this superhyperbolic title :P

Merry belated whatevers!

“Invest in the future, build for the web!”, take 2, at OSOM

I am right now in Cluj-Napoca, in Romania, for OSOM.ro, an small totally non profit volunteer-organised conference. I gave an updated, shorter revised version of the talk I gave at Amsterdam past June. As usual here are the slides and the source for the slides.

It is more or less the same, but better, and I also omitted some sections and spoke a bit about Firefox Developer Edition.

Also I was wearing this Fox-themed sweater which was imbuing me with special powers for sure:

fox sweater

(I found it at H & M past Saturday, there are more animals if foxes aren’t your thing).

There were some good discussions about open source per se, community building and growing. And no, talks were not recorded.

I feel a sort of strange emptiness now, as this has been my last talk for the year, but it won’t be long until other commitments fill that vacuum. Like MozLandia—by this time next week I’ll be travelling to, or already in, Portland, for our work week. And when I’m back I plan to gradually slide into a downward spiral into the idleness. At least until 2015.

Looking forward to meeting some mozillians I haven’t met yet, and also visiting Ground Kontrol again and exploring new coffee shops when we have a break in Portland, though :-)