Tag Archives: web audio

A peek at Peer to Peer

It’s incredible how time flies and how changing the weather can be! Today’s a sweet bright slightly chill Monday in London, whereas last week it was VERY COLD and horrible.

I also happened to spend most of Monday in a studio in Islington recording my Peer to Peer session on… guess what… Web Audio!

The host was Drew Neil, from Vimcasts fame. He set a challenge for me that consisted in writing a system that could perform an interpretation of Steve Reich’s “Clapping Music“.

It’s a simple concept, but it also involves a lot of different techniques and APIs so it was quite a lot of fun!

Sadly you’ll have to wait at least a couple of months until the editing and subtitling is done. Until then… maybe you want to check out the existing videos!

UPDATE, about 15 minutes later: it’s grey and raining now. 👌🏼😂

No more tap tap tap sounds: yay!

A few days ago the fantastic Fritz from the Netherlands told me that my Hands On Web Audio slides had stopping working and there was no sound coming out from them in Firefox.

Which is pretty disappointing for a slide deck that is built to teach you about Web Audio!

I noticed that the issue was only on the introductory slide which uses a modified version of Stuart Memo’s fantastic THX sound recreation-the rest of slides did play sound.

I built an isolated test case (source) that used a parameter-capable version of the THX sound code, just in case the issue depended on the number of oscillators, and submitted this funnily titled bug to the Web Audio component: Entirely Web Audio generated sound cuts out after a little while, or emits random tap tap tap sounds then silence.

I can happily confirm that the bug has been fixed in Nightly and the fix will hopefully be “uplifted” to DevEdition very soon, as it was due to a regression.

Paul Adenot (who works in Web Audio and is a Web Audio spec editor, amongst a couple tons of other cool things) was really excited about the bug, saying it was very edge-casey! Yay! And he also explained what did actually happen in lay terms: “you’d have to have a frequency that goes down very very slowly so that the FFT code could not keep up”, which is what the THX sound is doing with the filter frequency automation.

I want to thank both Fritz for spotting this out and letting me know and also Stuart for sharing his THX code. It’s amazing what happens when you put stuff on the net and lots of different people use it in different ways and configurations. Together we make everything more robust :-)

Of course also sending thanks to Paul and Ben for identifying and fixing the issue so fast! It’s not been even a week! Woohoo!

Well done everyone! 👏🏼

On Loop 2015

I was invited to join a panel about Open Source and Music in Loop, an slightly unusual (for my “standards”) event. It wasn’t a conference per se, although there were talks. Most of the sessions were panels and workshops, there were very little “individual” talk tracks. Lots of demos, unusual hardware to play with in the hall, relaxed atmosphere, and very little commercialism—really cool!

Continue reading On Loop 2015

“The disconnected ensemble”, at JSConf.Budapest

Here I am in Budapest (for the first time ever 😮)! I’m back in the hotel after having a quick dinner on my own. I didn’t join the party because I had a massive headache and also I was getting so sleepy, no coffee could fight that (also probably the two things were related). But once I started wandering towards my hotel I found myself feeling so much better, and stumbled upon a cosy nice place and ended up stopping there for some food.

When I came back from the speakers’ dinner yesterday, I practiced setting up all my stuff and going through the demos again, which are in fact ran on real, physical devices, i.e. phones.

Continue reading “The disconnected ensemble”, at JSConf.Budapest

Reading list, 5

13-19th April 2015

  • tableflip dot club by (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻: “We’ve watched mediocre men whiz by us on a glass escalator […] we’re denied opportunities because we aren’t “ready” for them […] It’s time we take our potential elsewhere […] We’re sharing our long memories of all the creeps who’ve hit on us and the cowards who’ve failed to promote us”. Oh wow. This resonates so much with some of my experiences, wow. Yes. More tableflips are in order!
  • Of undocumented Chrome features and unreadable W3C specs by ppk: “this sad state of affairs prevents me from writing tests and reporting their outcome on all these new, exciting technologies”, or why new undocumented APIs without examples are a tragic failure
  • The newly created Web Audio London meetup has published videos with the talks from the first meetup! they are in its YouTube channel
  • There is also a Music Hackspace in London! I haven’t been so I can’t tell how good is it.
  • More music: my pal Andy Lemon made a series of Commodore 64-based covers of 80s tunes
  • Gifsicle – command line animated GIFs. We can always add new tools for our Animated GIF battles. Its website is pretty terse but the GitHub page is more detailed: “it can merge several GIFs into a GIF animation; explode an animation into its component frames; change individual frames in an animation; turn interlacing on and off; add transparency; add delays, disposals, and looping to animations; add and remove comments; flip and rotate; optimize animations for space; change images’ colormaps; and other things”… *swooooooooning*
  • More control over text-decoration by Chris Coyier at CSS-Tricks — where the text-decoration CSS property can be further controlled with three new sub-properties: text-decoration-color, text-decoration-line and text-decoration-style. This is fantastic! I’m going to start using text-decoration-style: wavy everywhere! 😉
  • More CSS! Gradients are sometimes hard to visualise, so Patrick Brosset wrote a tool which would do exactly that. This week, he moved it from codepen to a GitHub repository. Look at it–can you make it better?
  • Despoblados en Huesca – a website that collects all the abandoned towns and smaller settlements in Huesca, an Spanish province. I’m fascinated both by this and by the idea that some people do take over some of these settlements and make them inhabitable again. This notion of self-sufficiency has always intrigued me.
  • DiscoGS – I acquired a Sinology home NAS last week and I have been carefully rearranging and sorting my music collection. This website is a fantastic resource when you really start getting perfectionist and detailed about PROPERLY TAGGING the files.