Category Archives: Events

One demo: two new bugs!

I thought that since I was going to the Web Audio Hack Day here in Singapore, it would be great to have a more Web Audio focused Media Recorder demo, so I built a little demo that essentially asks for audio permission, then records a short clip of audio, decodes it as an audio buffer and uses it to loop a BufferSourceNode in Web Audio.

You wouldn’t believe what happened next… or would you?

Two Things That Happened When Sole Ran This Demo

1. Chrome Canary Just Totally Gave Up

Aw, snap!

I filed a bug, since there wasn’t really much I could do…

2. Nightly Sometimes Insisted In Returning Some Mysterious 596 Samples Length Which Was Totally Not What I Expected, And Did So Without Following Any Meaningful Reproducible Pattern

596 samples for some reason

I tried to dump the contents of the returned blob once read as a buffer, using String.fromCharCode–perhaps looking at binary data while having my breakfast coffee would enlighten me?

I eat hex dumps for breakfast

As it turns out, no. So I filed another bug.

Try this yourself maybe?

instalooper

The demo is here: instalooper (sources) … just in case you want to play with the code–maybe it will be fixed next month, who knows!!? Or maybe it is just a bug in my machine and it works in everyone else’s!

Disclaimer: I have not tested this anywhere else than Nightly and Canary. So I’ve no idea of how it works (or not) in mobile.

I have a more complicated version that not only loops the sample but also randomly changes its playback frequency. Sometimes the generated sounds are strangely fascinating. It still needs a bit of interface work, but hey… watch out, Steve Reich! 😎

And now… time to prepare to go to the airport and fly to Melbourne for JSConf.AU! More jetlag, YAY!

Talking about Servo in Hackference Birmingham 2016

I visited Birmingham for the very first time last week, to give a talk at Hackference. Apparently the organiser always swears that it will always be the last hackference, and it has been “the last one” for the last four editions. Teehehe!

I spoke about Servo. They didn’t record the talks but I did an screencast, so here’s it:

📽 Here are the slides, if you want to follow along (or maybe run the demos!). The demos come from the servo-experiments repository, if you want to try more demos than the ones I showed.

If you watched this talk at ColdFrontConf, this one has more clarifications added to it, so complicated aspects should be easier to follow now (specially the explanations about layout calculations, optimisations, parallelisation and work stealing algorithms).

People enjoyed the talk!

Someone even forked one the dogemania experiment to display other images:

And Martin got so intrigued about Servo, he even sent a PR!

I didn’t get to see much of the city, to be honest, but two things caught my attention:

a) it was quite empty even during ‘rush hours’
b) people were quite calm and chill

That’s perhaps why Jessica Rose is always saying that Birmingham is The Absolute Best place. I will have to find out some other time!

A very funny thing / activity / experiment happened in the slot before my talk. It was a reenactment of the BBC’s Just A Minute show, which I have never watched in my life. Essentially you have 4 participants and each one has a little device to “stop the show” when the active participant messes up. The active participant has to speak for a minute on a given topic, but they cannot hesitate or repeat words, so it starts getting challenging! This was organised and conducted by Andrew Faraday, who also helped run the Web Audio London meetup a while ago and is always an interesting nice person to talk to.

So this, this was hilarious beyond anything I expected. I guess because I didn’t expect any funny thing in particular, and also because I didn’t have any preconception of any of the participants being a “funny person” per se, so the whole comedy came from the situation and their reactions. It had some memorable moments, such as Terence Eden’s “unexploded item in bagging area” (in relation to the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 exploding fiasco, plus the very annoying voice that anyone who’s ever used a self-service checkout till in the UK will recognise 😏).

After so much laughing, I was super relaxed when the time for my talk came! Every conference should have Andrew doing this. It was excellent!

Other interesting talks and things:

  • Felienne Hermans’ on machine learning and bridge playing AIs built with DSLs built with F# – I basically don’t know much about any of these subjects, so I figured this could be an interesting challenge. You can watch this recording of this talk from another conference, if intrigued.
  • Martin Splitt’s aka geekonaut talk on WebGL – if you have the chance to watch it, it will be quite informative for people who want to get started in WebGL and learn about what it can do for you
  • I’m certainly not a Web Audio beginner, but I tend to watch those talks anyway as I am always curious to see how other people present on Web Audio. Hugh Rawlinson‘s presentation on Web Audio had a few interesting nuggets like Audiocrawl, which showcases the most interesting things in Web Audio. He also worked on meyda, which is a library to do feature detection using Web Audio.
  • Jonathan Kingsley gave one of the most depressing and hilarious talks I’ve seen in a long time. IoT is such a disaster, and the Dyn DDoS attack via IoT devices, just a couple hours after this talk, was so on point, it almost seemed deliberate.
  • Finally Remy declared his love for the web and encouraged everyone to get better and be better to others – and also stressed that you don’t need to use all the latest fashions in order to be a web developer. It’s good when renowned speakers like Remy admit to not to like frameworks, despite also seeing their strengths. A bit of balance never hurt anyone!

The conference had a very low key tone, let’s say that it was a bit “organise as you go”, but due to the small scale of the conference that wasn’t much of a problem. As I mentioned before, everything was pretty chill and everyone was very approachable and willing to help you sort things out. It’s not like a had a terrible problem, anyway: my biggest problem was that my badge had been temporarily lost, but no one told me off for not wearing a badge while inside the venue, and I eventually got it, heheh. So yeah, nice and friendly people, both attendees and organisers.

I also liked that everything was super close to the train station. So there was no need for additional transportation, and we could use the many food places in the station to have lunch, which was super convenient.

Oh and Jessica as MC was the best, I really enjoyed the introductions she prepared for each speaker, and the way she led the time between talks, and she was really funny, unless presenters that think they are funny (but aren’t).

If you have the chance, attend the next Hackference! It might the last one! 😝

Here are other conference write ups: from Dan Pope and from Flaki (who stayed for the hackathon during the week-end).

Talking about Web Audio in WeCodeSign Podcast

I recorded an episode for the WeCodeSign podcast. It’s in Spanish!

You can download / listen from their website.

We actually talked about more than Web Audio; there’s a list of links to things we mentioned during the episode. From progressive enhancement to Firefox’s Web Audio editor, to the old PCMania tracking stories, to Firefox for iOS… lots of things!

I was really pleased with the experience. The guys were really good at planning, and did a great job editing the podcast as well (and they use Audacity!).

Totally recommended—in fact I suggested that both my fantastic colleague Belén and the very cool Buriticá are interviewed at some point in the future.

I’d love to hear what they have to say!

Throwback to the last time I recorded a podcast in Spanish–at least this time I wasn’t under a massive cold! 🙃

“Hands-On Web Audio” at London JS meetup

I gave my “Hands-On Web Audio” talk at the London JS meetup, held at the offices of Just Eat. It was broadcasted as a Hangout, and also recorded so you can replay or see if you couldn’t attend:



BAAAAH they seem to have deleted or disabled the video. BAHHHHH!

If you want to play along, the slides are live here and here is the source code as well. Disclaimer: depending on your computer, they might be a bit too much in both Firefox or Chrome. There seems to have been a regression and the intro sound is extremely stuttering in “slower” computers (slower as in “a MacBook Retina”).

It was a bit awkward because their big screen was actually six TVs and most of the content in my slides is centered vertically on the slide, which coincided with the middle of the frames, so it was quite unreadable. That is why you’ll hear a number of comments akin to “oh this is very inconvenient” from me, during the talk.

After I finished the talk itself, we had a round of questions, and I also showed how to debug web audio with the Web Audio editor in Firefox DevTools.

Feedback on the talk seems really positive and I’m happy people got interested in playing with the Web Audio API and making dubstep! YES!

Great talk! I left inspired to go play. I’d used some features of the audio API before but Sole’s enthusiasm and dubstep obsession triggered a string desire to get creative with it again.

Spectacular demo by Soledad. She really knows what she’s talking about

I’m really happy that people were happy and interested in the API 🙂

Side note, 1

A few people asked me about the slides: how are they made?! are they WebGL?! can they use the system to make their own slides?

Answer: they are WebGL, and they use three.js underneath. Right now the system is quite hardcoded, but I’m happy to announce that I’m working on refactoring the code so anyone can build their own 3D slide deck, using their own demo scenes. So I guess I am building a slide deck framework… 😬 #sendhelp

You can have a look at the project here, but don’t send me requests yet, kthx. An online demo is available as well. Right now it can only render basic H1-H4 and P nodes… in 3D! Not bad!

Side note, 2

I was really excited that I made it to the meetup (!), because I forgot my phone home that morning. I found out when I was in the office already, and I didn’t want to go back. So I printed the map and started cycling to the meetup place. Except I didn’t know very well the area, so I got lost twice. Not too bad though, I stopped and produced my paper map and let people look at me with weird looks (“she’s looking at a paper map!”). Anyway, I used:

a) my brain, instead of trusting everything to a GPS enabled device
b) those little maps in the street showing where you are

and I made it!

The way back was easier as I knew the area before. I tracked my route using my fitbit, and was really pleased to see that I had reached almost 30km/h on my humble Brompton.

It was coincidentally also Cycle To Work day yesterday, so I was doubly pleased that I cycled to work and also to meet up.

Should there be a Cycle To Meetup day too? I think so 😏